Research Courses

2016 Research Courses:

 

Aquatic Ecology

Students will work alongside Dr. Tuberty and his graduate students to develop the skills of an aquatic ecologist and environmental scientist. Students will sample undisturbed headwater streams in western North Carolina to investigate/explore relationships described in the River Continuum Concept by Vannote, et al., 1980. Data from benthic macro-invertebrate and water chemistry samples from undisturbed areas will be compared to samples from local impacted streams of the High Country to determine and predict significant changes in correlations between the land cover/use and the physical, chemical and biological aspects of the aquatic systems. Field-based experiences will focus on case studies that introduce environmental problems that will serve as models for a variety of student-based research designs. Biological topics will include aquatic population and biodiversity responses to toxins or disturbance, laboratory and field sampling and analytical methods, and statistical analysis of data. As a field course, students will visit sites in Boone and surrounding areas to take advantage of the large number of unique local water resources. Therefore, appropriate shoes and clothing that can get wet/muddy are needed. Old tennis shoes, or shoes such as Keen, Chaco, or Teva that stay strapped on, but can be worn in the river and dry quickly are needed. Also, this class will participate in a 3-5 day hiking/sampling trip to the Great Smoky Mountains National Park, which includes 3-4 nights of camping. Students enrolled in this course will need to bring a sleeping bag, sunscreen, bug spray, water bottle, hat, headlamp and/or flashlight, and clothing/shoes appropriate for hiking and camping. Tents will also be needed but each student need not provide their own tent if others can share. Once class assignments have been made, you will be contacted whether you have a tent to bring/share. It is important that you enjoy/want to experience the outdoors and are willing to commit to working extensively in streams if you select this class. Each student will develop a research hypothesis, collect necessary data to test this hypothesis, write a research paper, and present their findings at the research symposium. Prefer students who have completed Biology and Earth/ Environmental Science. [Please note that a female residence staff member will accompany students on the camping trip.]

    Dr. Shea Tuberty, Department of Biology, ASU

    Mr. Kelly Ruff, East Burke High School, Burke County Schools

    Mr. Matthew Fleetwood, Graduate Student, Dept. of Biology, ASU

    Mr. Alvin Antonio, Clinton High School, SVSM Fellow

 

Experimental Field Geology/Hydrology

Say the word “environment” to most people and it conjures up images of living organisms. But the lithosphere is just as much a part of the Earth as the biosphere, and the interactions between humans and their geologic environment can have profound effects, for better or worse. In this course, students will investigate some of the human impacts on rivers and streams, focusing on three areas: stream sediments and solid wastes, natural and human-derived changes in stream water chemistry, and flooding hazards. This is a field-based course and we will spend as much time outside as possible, visiting sites in Boone and surrounding areas to take advantage of the unique local geology and topography. Therefore, appropriate shoes and clothing that can get wet/muddy are needed. Teva/Chaco/Keen sandals are ideal for wearing in the rivers/streams plus sturdy shoes. Students will need a hat, water bottle and sunscreen. Samples and data will be collected in the field and laboratory analyses will complement the fieldwork to help students develop an understanding of the natural processes involved and any changes due to human interactions. Each student will develop his/her own research hypothesis, collect the necessary data to test this hypothesis, write a paper, and present findings at the research symposium. Completion of Chemistry or Earth/Environmental science preferred, but not required.

    Mr. Scott Taylor, Hibriten High School, Caldwell County Schools

    Ms. Caroline Clark, Greene Central High School, SVSM Fellow

 

Exploratory Data Analysis

In today’s data driven society, it is a prerequisite of those studying science and mathematics that they understand data collection, analysis and application. In this course, we will deeply examine the process by which we collect and manipulate data. Please note that this is not an introductory statistics course. Our focus will be on interpretation of data as opposed to development of statistical theory. We will explore applications of data within the context of topics including, but not limited to, statistical inference, game theory, voting theory, rank order data, data envelopment analysis as well as data applications within the social sciences. Students will explore techniques investigating both quantitative and qualitative data through experimental design and simulation. Students will work both individually and collaboratively to obtain a mastery of the topics presented. At the conclusion of the course, students will use available data sets to develop their own unique research project that includes producing a paper and preparing an oral presentation.

    Mr. Caleb Marsh & Mr. Tyrel Winebarger, Mathematics Department, Caldwell Community College & Technical Institute and ASU

 

Flight Science

Birds, bats and insects may make it look easy, but flying is actually a rather challenging endeavor. Despite working on the problem at least since the time of the ancient Greeks, it is only in relatively recent history that people have finally "conquered" the air. How was this accomplished, and what has been learned since? This course will begin with a study of the physics of flight using vehicles, toys, and flight in the natural world. It will then move on to some of the more important engineering and design principles involved in flying objects and rocketry. Applying this knowledge will allow us to design, build, test, and redesign various flight vehicles. Since construction and testing are inherently messy affairs, students are strongly advised to bring an old shirt to wear in class. Students will present their research findings via a written descriptive paper and oral presentation.

     Dr. John Cockman Department of Physics & Astronomy, ASU

     Mr. Coleman Bailey, Avery High School, Avery County Schools

 

World Class Hackers #Python:TheHolyGrailofHacking

“Another one got caught today, it’s all over the news and social media. “Teenager Arrested in Computer Crime Scandal”, “Hacker Arrested after Bank Tampering”. All teenagers are the viewed the same. They’re all alike.

But did you ever take a look behind the eyes of a hacker? Have you ever wondered what makes them tick, what forces shape them, what may have molded them? I am an ethical hacker. Enter my world…”           -Revised from the Hacker’s Manifesto

This course explores a number of diverse areas and issues that arise in security for those aspiring to become ‘world class hackers’. The main focus will be on the programming language, Python, which is considered to be the “Holy Grail” of hacking languages. You will learn how to use scripts to complete a number of topics and tasks, which include but are not limited to: keylogging, antivirus evasion, automation scanning and social engineering exploits. In order for students to actively complete the topics, some fundamental learning in the areas of programming, networking, operating systems, and virtualization will also be covered. Students will actively participate in activities that allow visually seeing the effects of hacking, both as a hacker and as the victim. You will also complete research that is compiled from the tasks associated with Python scripting. Projects will culminate in a research paper and presentation at the research symposium. No prerequisites are required, but prefer students with some programming experience, understanding of networking and/or operating systems.

     Dr. Dawn Medlin, Department of Computer Information Systems, ASU

     Mr. Chris Taylor, Department of Computer Information Systems, ASU

 

Biomedical Science

This course will only be open to a select few (~5-8) Summer Ventures students because they will be working alongside students from another academic program (Future Doctors & Scientists) and graduate students. Current research includes examining factors contributing to pre-term labor and various properties of the super plant, Moringa. The class will also participate in The Apprentice Doctor® course, learning practical clinical, medical, and surgical skills. Research activities will involve basic research, using animal models, and biomedical instrumentation techniques (e.g., animal handling, tissue processing, protein, RNA and DNA isolations, determination of RNA and protein concentrations, RT-PCR, gel-based PCR, Real-Time PCR, Western blot and confocal immunofluorescence, data analysis). Students will acquire transferable soft and hard skills through mastery of biomedical research technical skills and scientific processes, and learn about career opportunities in medicine and biomedical research. All students will complete a research paper to be presented at the research symposia at the end of the program. Completion of AP Chemistry or AP Biology is preferred. Students will be required to wear scrubs during certain class meetings as well as may have to conduct laboratory testing/monitoring/analyses outside of regular class hours.

    Dr. Chishimba (Nathan) Mowa, Department of Biology, ASU

    Mr. Brandon Smith, Graduate Student, Dept. of Biology, ASU

    Mr. Tanner Orders, Undergraduate Student, Dept. of Biology, ASU

    Ms. Jennifer Hurst, Avery High School, SVSM Fellow

    Dr. Anton Scheepers, MChD – Surgery and Dentistry, Johannesburg, South Africa, The Apprentice Doctor®     

            www.theapprenticedoctor.com

 

2015 Research Courses

Aquatic Environmental Science

Students will practice the skills of an environmental scientist by investigating human impacts on rivers, streams and ponds, with focus on water chemistry, heavy metals in stream water and sediments, emerging contaminants in municipal wastewater effluents, and endocrine disruption. Field-based experiences will focus on local Boone area environmental problems that will serve as the basis for a variety of student-centered research projects. Biological topics will include aquatic population and biodiversity responses to toxins or disturbance, lab & field sampling and analytical methods, and statistical analysis of data. As a field course, students will visit sites in Boone and surrounding areas to take advantage of the large number of high quality and unique water resources. Therefore, appropriate "river shoes" (such as Keen, Teva, Chaco, etc.) and clothing that can get wet/muddy are needed. Students will also canoe sections of the New River and camp over a three-day period. Students will need to bring a sleeping bag and tent for this excursion (further information will be sent out once class assignments have been made about tents/equipment). Each student will develop a research hypothesis, collect necessary data to test this hypothesis, provide a written report of their project, and present their findings at the closing symposium.

Exploratory Data Analysis

In today's data driven society, it is a pre-requisite of those studying science and mathematics that they understand data collection, analysis and application. In this course, we will deeply examine the process by which we collect and manipulate data. Please note, this is not an introductory statistics course. Our focus will be on interpretation of data as opposed to development of statistical theory. We will explore applications of data within the context of topics including, but not limited to, statistical inference, game theory, voting theory, rank order data, data envelopment analysis as well as data applications within the social sciences. Students will explore techniques investigating both quantitative and qualitative data through experimental design and simulation. Students will work both individually and collaboratively to obtain a mastery of the topics presented. At the conclusion of the course students will either generate their own data or use available data sets to develop their own unique research project that includes producing a paper and preparing an oral presentation.

Flight Science

The first rockets ever built, the fire-arrows of the Chinese, were not very reliable. Many just exploded on launching! Today, rockets are much more reliable. They fly on precise courses and are capable of going fast enough to escape the gravitational pull of Earth. How is this done? We will investigate the fascinating scientific theories involved with rocketry, including physical principles such as Newton's Laws, the aerodynamic forces that operate on objects in flight (weight, lift, drag, and thrust), different propellants and various engineering concepts such as stability and optimal mass. Applying this knowledge will allow us to design, construct, and test various models to investigate the aerodynamic capabilities and challenges of rocketry. Students will complete investigations by designing, flying and refining actual model rockets. Finally, they will present their findings via a written descriptive research paper and oral presentation.

Visual & Image Processing

This course will integrate two areas of study in computer science. First, students will have the opportunity to learn about some digital image processing techniques. Explorations will include image acquisition and display, properties of the human visual system, sampling and quantization, color image representations, image enhancement, transformations, compression and restoration. Second, students will investigate the role of visualization in science, engineering, medicine, and education and will have opportunities to learn different visualization techniques that can be applied to solve problems. Emphasis will be on visualization of data, using available tools to build and understand computational models, and understanding/visualizing solutions to proposed problems. MATLAB, ImageJ, and Excel will be used extensively, but prior knowledge is not required. Students will have daily hands-on activities and will conduct an inquiry-based research project, produce a written paper and oral presentation.

 

summer ventures in science and mathematics svsm

Contact

Lori Tyler
Program Director
121-B College of Education
828-262-6369
tylerle@appstate.edu

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